Opening Minds

Videos

OPENING MINDS ENDING STIGMA “CAMPUS CHALLENGES”

There is a mental health crisis facing college students.  One in five young people between the ages 14 to 24 will experience mental illness.  Left untreated, it can cause bigger problems later on.

Opening Minds Ending Stigma: Campus Challenges,” a riveting 30-minute documentary is a program that features candid and inspiring stories of college students and their families impacted by mental illness, illuminates the challenges presented by mental health conditions, the stigma that often delays effective treatment, and that recovery is possible. Also discussed is the rising suicide rate among young people on campus. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students.

OPENING MINDS ENDING STIGMA, a statewide campaign launched a year ago by the Ethel and James Flinn Foundation and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, presents a new mental health awareness broadcast in September in conjunction with National Suicide Prevention Month.

Mental illness is a health condition, that is treatable –just as physical conditions like diabetes or heart disease. Research has shown people with mental health conditions can live full productive lives.  Research has also shown that without proper treatment, mental health conditions can worsen and make day-to-day life difficult.

OPENING MINDS ENDING STIGMA “BREAKING BARRIERS”

It impacts every family, every neighborhood, every race and religion. But mental health conditions are treatable.

Opening Minds Ending Stigma: Breaking Barriers,” a riveting 30-minute documentary is a program that features candid and inspiring stories of Michigan families impacted by mental illness, who, following treatment and recovery, are actively involved in mental health advocacy and support.

OPENING MINDS ENDING STIGMA, a statewide campaign launched a year ago by the Ethel and James Flinn Foundation and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, is debuting a new mental health awareness broadcast in May to coincide with Mental Health Month.

While one in five people will experience a mental health condition in a given year, too often help is not sought. Often it is stigma that may come from our own expectations, our family’s, as well as cultural and religious views that present additional roadblocks. Communities of color are often more reluctant to talk about mental health (the National Alliance on Mental Illness found African Americans are 20-percent more likely to experience severe mental health conditions). But there is help!

Mental illness is a health condition, that is treatable –just as physical conditions like diabetes or heart disease. Research has shown people with mental health conditions can live full productive lives.  Research has also shown that without proper treatment, mental health conditions can worsen and make day-to-day life difficult.

OPENING MINDS ENDING STIGMA “SAVING YOUNG LIVES”

Suicide is the second leading cause of death among young people, with statistics showing that 90-percent of those who take their own lives had a mental illness.

OPENING MINDS ENDING STIGMA, a statewide campaign of the Ethel and James Flinn Foundation and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, presents a new mental health awareness broadcast in September in conjunction with National Suicide Prevention Month.

Opening Minds Ending Stigma: Saving Young Lives,” a 30-minute documentary features candid and inspiring stories of young Michigan residents and families impacted by mental illness, who, following treatment and recovery, are actively involved in mental health advocacy and support.

The program explores the factors that may increase the risks, and provides information to identify warning signs and effectively respond to assist a family member, friend, or ourselves. It also aims at ending the stigma of mental illness which can prevent young people from seeking help, visiting Michigan schools and universities to reveal programs that offer support to students, particularly those in the highly vulnerable 14 to 24 age range.  Mental health professionals team with educators, and peer support specialists to provide information and insight designed to bring greater understanding of the importance of early intervention.

OPENING MINDS ENDING STIGMA “EARLY INTERVENTION IS KEY”

DETROIT – One in five young people between the ages of 14 to 24 will experience mental illness. Left untreated, it can cause bigger problems later on.

With May being National Mental Health Awareness Month, the Ethel and James Flinn Foundation and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) have teamed up to change the conversation with young people about mental illness as they launch the “Opening Minds Ending Stigma” statewide campaign.

Opening Minds Ending Stigma “Early Intervention is Key” a 30-minute film features inspiring and candid stories of young Michigan residents and families impacted by mental illness, illuminates the challenges presented by mental disorders, the stigma that often delays effective treatment, and that recovery is possible. Leading Michigan-based experts in pediatric care, educators, parent/child relationships and peer support programs also appear to bring greater understanding of the importance of early intervention.

OPENING MINDS ENDING STIGMA “A YOUNG PERSON’S PERSPECTIVE”

DETROIT — One in five children and young adults will experience mental illness, with the onset commonly occurring between ages 14 and 24.  The statistics from the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) also reveal that there is an average delay of eight years from initial symptoms to effective treatment.

OPENING MINDS – ENDING STIGMA, A YOUNG PERSON’S PERSPECTIVE, a new video for broadcast and educational use, explores the warning signs and early intervention approaches that can address mental illness at its most treatable stage.  Through personal stories which are candidly told by young people who have faced challenges associated with a variety of mental disorders, viewers discover when and where to seek help.  The 30-minute special aims to promote understanding of mental illness and remove obstacles to treatment for children, adolescents, and young adults.

The Flinn Foundation in concert with DWMHA produced this privately funded special as what they hope to be a statewide effort to educate people about mental illness and improve services and treatment. Schools, colleges, mental health organizations, and others are free to use this video as a community service tool.

OPENING MINDS ENDING STIGMA

DETROIT  — Did you know that one in four people has a mental illness?

It impacts every community, every race, and does not discriminate. Some of the most brilliant minds and talented people on the planet – including two U.S. presidents, famous actors, professional athletes, military members and countless others — also have a mental illness. Mental illness is a medical condition just like physical illness.  People can live successful lives with early intervention and effective treatment.

As part of Mental Health Awareness Month, the Ethel and James Flinn Foundation in partnership with the Detroit Wayne Mental Health Authority is proud to present “Opening Minds, Ending Stigma” – a compelling 30-minute TV special. The special features Michigan leaders, mental health organizations, and people with mental illness in a probing look at the issues and solutions in delivering care and ending the stigma associated with it.

The Flinn Foundation in concert with DWMHA produced this privately funded special as the kickoff of what they hope to be a statewide effort to educate people about mental illness and improve services and treatment.